Yves Suter – Hamburg is not a meal

Swiss photographer Yves Suter shows a personal view on the city of Hamburg.

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Dedicated to chaotic structures and influenced by the simple and clean lines of german photography he tries to combine these inputs into this zine. His black/white photography aims to show a combination of people, emotional moments and urban city life in a clean and simple way.
The Zine ‚Hamburg is not a meal‘ shows pictures he took in the hanseatic city, where he lived for about 4 years.

Text and images from www.yvessuter.com

Florian van Roekel – How Terry drinks his coffee

Florian van Roekel’s book ‘How Terry drinks his coffee’ was his exam project at the Royal Academy of Art in the Hague in 2010 and became an emediate succes. In 2011 it was taken in  Martin Parr’s selection of the 30 most influential photobooks of the last decade.

Tatyana Palyga – Colorless Days

  

 

Russian Photographer Tatyana Palyga photographed her own (work) surrounding, showing us the way she experiences the routine she is in. In a subtle alienating way she shares her insiders perspective with us. Reminds me of Florian van Roekel’s ‘How Terry likes his Coffee’.

 

I work in a sales department at a plant that produces soft drinks. My working day begins at 9 a.m.
At 9 a.m. I must put my admission card to a special sensor at the clock-house to witness my appearance in the workplace. It is easy to check up punctuality of the employees. A few minutes and I am in the office. I pass through a long empty corridor where all the doors are closed. On the walls there are pictures depicting giant fruits. I enter the room, briefly say hello to my colleagues and sit down to my workplace.
I switch my computer on. While it is being loaded, I move a frame on a wall calendar to the following date. As usual I count the days left until the week-end. I open my mail-box and delete unnecessary letters. Then I make some daily reports. I boil water in a teapot, drink a cup of tea.
Dinner time comes. The employees have the advantage of eating in a good canteen. A dinner is an outstanding event in the office life. If you manage to occupy a seat by the window it is possible to find out what the weather is today.
After the dinner I do a couple of phone calls, some Excel tables, and drink one more cup of tea. Once in a while someone drops in to chat with me for a couple of minutes. But not every day.
At 6 p.m. I stand up, put on a coat, say “good-bye” to those who stays at the office. Passing by a reception, I say ritually to a secretary girl: “How come you’re still here? It’s time to go home!”
Next morning I have to wake up at 7 o’clock. There will be a new day. A truly new one?

April 24, 2010

Adam Jeppesen – Wake

Beautifully and diversely photographed and a just as beatifull subtle narrative. This personal story, made while traveling on assignment, reminds me why i love photography.

“Jeppesen’s large-format photographs are rooted in the tradition of German documentary with its tendency toward classification. This is an impressionistic take on the visual index–one that seeks out the spontaneous and the discarded, the undefined and the uncertain. As the title suggests, the images inhabit that liminal space between darkness and twilight: atmosphere, heavy and thick, flows like a life force through the book, and always manages to obscure as much as it reveals. The specificity of the people, places, and things all fade, leaving light, color, and texture as the only framework, along with the impression that what we see is not necessarily what we are shown.” Steidl.