Yves Suter – Hamburg is not a meal

Swiss photographer Yves Suter shows a personal view on the city of Hamburg.

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Dedicated to chaotic structures and influenced by the simple and clean lines of german photography he tries to combine these inputs into this zine. His black/white photography aims to show a combination of people, emotional moments and urban city life in a clean and simple way.
The Zine ‚Hamburg is not a meal‘ shows pictures he took in the hanseatic city, where he lived for about 4 years.

Text and images from www.yvessuter.com

Brad Zellar & Alec Soth – House of Coates

 
 
 

In House of Coates, writer Brad Zellar pieces together the story of legendary recluse Lester B. Morrison. Working from a handful of encounters and contradictory conversations, a sketchy paper trail and often confounding interviews with individuals who may or may not have been “associates” of Morrison (including Morrison’s former collaborator Alec Soth), Zellar attempts to reconstruct one episode from Morrison’s decidedly episodic life. In the winter of 2011, Zellar finally crossed paths with his evasive subject, and was –with Morrison’s permission– granted access to the results of an MMPI (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory) test that Morrison submitted to in August of 2009, along with the administrating psychiatrist’s copious notes. Finally, in late December of last year, Zellar received in the mail a duct-taped shoebox –marked “PERISHABLE”– containing almost two hundred photographs that Morrison termed “disposable documents of the approximate period in question.”

From these raw materials designer Hans Seeger has assembled a book that Morrison himself has pronounced, “Probably close enough to what might or might not have happened, and that’s as much as I’ve learned to expect from the so-called ‘real world.’”

Source; littlebrownmushroom

Ryan McGinley

     

“The skateboarders, musicians, graffiti artists and gay people in Mr. McGinley’s early work ‘know what it means to be photographed,’ said Sylvia Wolf, the former curator of photography at the Whitney, who organized his show there. “His subjects are performing for the camera and exploring themselves with an acute self-awareness that is decidedly contemporary. They are savvy about visual culture, acutely aware of how identity can be not only communicated but created. They are willing collaborators.”

“People fall in love with McGinleyʼs work because it tells a story about liberation and hedonism: Where Goldin and Larry Clark were saying something painful and anxiety producing about Kids and what happens when they take drugs and have sex in an ungoverned urban underworld, McGinley started out announcing that “The Kids Are Alright,” fantastic, really, and suggested that a gleeful, unfettered subculture was just around the corner—’still’—if only you knew where to look.” “Like his earliest works these images were documentary. He was a fly on the wall. But then he began to direct the activities, photographing his subjects in a cinema-verite mode. “I got to the point where I couldn’t wait for the pictures to happen anymore,” he said. “I was wasting time, and so I started making pictures happen. It borders between being set up or really happening. There’s that fine line.” “Photography is about freezing a moment in time; McGinley’s is about freezing a stage in a lifetime. Young and beautiful is as fleeting as a camera snap–and thus all the more worth preserving.” Ariel Levy – nymag.com

Adam Jeppesen – Wake

Beautifully and diversely photographed and a just as beatifull subtle narrative. This personal story, made while traveling on assignment, reminds me why i love photography.

“Jeppesen’s large-format photographs are rooted in the tradition of German documentary with its tendency toward classification. This is an impressionistic take on the visual index–one that seeks out the spontaneous and the discarded, the undefined and the uncertain. As the title suggests, the images inhabit that liminal space between darkness and twilight: atmosphere, heavy and thick, flows like a life force through the book, and always manages to obscure as much as it reveals. The specificity of the people, places, and things all fade, leaving light, color, and texture as the only framework, along with the impression that what we see is not necessarily what we are shown.” Steidl.